Vargo Wharn-Clip Titanium Knife

Weighs 19g
Code: AW13533
  • £59.99
  • (FREE UK & EU Delivery)
+ in Stock Now | Usually dispatched within 24 hours
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Vargo's Wharn-Clip Titanium Knife is a compact piece of kit with a simple and effective design. It's made from a hardened Titanium Alloy making it super strong and light. An integrated clip let's you keep this useful tool at hand and the sheath keeps the blade safely covered.

Vargo says:

Made from a special Japanese titanium alloy, the Vargo Titanium Wharn-Clip Knife is 1.5 times harder and 3 times stronger than pure titanium.

Its 'Wharncliffe' shape and single bevel grind make for an incredibly strong, sharp, and easy to hone blade.

The integrated clip and efficiently designed Kydex sheath offer convenient and safe carrying.

It’s the perfect lightweight knife for feathering up fuzz sticks or preparing trailside meals.

Sometimes you wish you had a bigger blade than the one on your penknife but you don't want the weight of a big knife - Vargo's Wharn-clip knife meets the requirement. There's no handle to speak of so using it to cut hard stuff is tricky - but it deals with all the general camp chores really well.

- Reviewed by Ultralight Outdoor Gear

  • Wharncliffe design for excellent point control and full blade cutting power
  • Single bevel grind for exceptional strength, sharpness, and ease of honing
  • Integrated clip for convenient carrying
  • Kydex sheath for lightweight protection
  • Blade Length: 2.7 inches (69 mm)
  • Overall Length: 5.4 inches (138 mm)
  • Thickness: 0.1 inch (3 mm)
  • Knife weight: 19g
  • Point: Wharncliffe
  • Material: titanium alloy
  • Sheath: Kydex
  • Hardness: Rockwell C 50
Showing our 1 review for Vargo Wharn-Clip Titanium Knife. Write a review ›
Review Summary - 3 out of 5 based on 1 rating.
September 30, 2016 |
Super light and handy, but only really for food prep

An incredibly light, handy little blade, and you can get a good edge on it. Note that it's a single-bevel edge, so it doesn't work well left-handed. The Wharncliffe-style blade gives you a useful point, like a Stanley knife. The only real downside is that the metal is still much softer than a good steel. It blunts quite quickly if you're feathering sticks for the fire, and the edge doesn't stand up to batoning - even my penknife is substantially stronger. It's great for food prep, gutting fish or light tasks like cutting twine, but if you're looking to use it for processing wood into tinder and kindling then you'll probably need something sturdier.

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